More Secrets and Videos

2012

Here are three videos I thought might be useful and or interesting for subscribers to the secret information course (you can use the form on the home page or to the right if you haven't yet signed up). One covers how to sue someone, and another looks at how to negotiate away most of your credit card debt. But the first video has to do with how the government is tracking your purchases and even movements more than ever...

FBI Tracks Your Transactions

The government is watching your purchases made with credit cards and even with store loyalty cards. They no longer need to get a warrant to do this thanks to more and more intrusive laws being passed in the name of national security. Some people argue that it doesn't really matter as long as you are not doing anything illegal. Others, including myself, feel that mistakes are often made by governments, and I prefer more privacy. This video describes some of what federal agents are doing with their new powers.

If you were paying attention, you will have noticed that by way of your transactions your location can be tracked in real time. Now, you can avoid this by paying cash, but if you do that too much you might be investigated (see our page on Big Brother for more about tracking of cash transactions - big-brother.html). A mix of payment methods is probably best for privacy.

If you were paying attention, you will have noticed that by way of your transactions your location can be tracked in real time. Now, you can avoid this by paying cash, but if you do that too much you might be investigated (see our page on Big Brother for more about tracking of cash transactions - big-brother.html). A mix of payment methods is probably best for privacy.

One simple step you can take for greater privacy is to at least get your store loyalty cards out of the loop. Those are the cards that get you discounts at the grocery store or drug store. Go get a new one for each store you frequent, but put the wrong address, phone number and email on them. I have done this without a problem more than once. Use your real name (or perhaps one that is very similar), so when the cashier sees your identification or credit card they do not get suspicious.

Now, you might wonder why you would use a credit card if you have gone to the trouble to use a fake store loyalty card. Their are two answers to this. First, the card with the misleading information means there is one less way to track you. The second is that while credit card companies are not generally selling your purchase information, there have been reports that some stores have done so. Do you really want health insurance companies and others to know what you buy?

How to Sue Someone

This video covers the basics of how you file a lawsuit against someone, whether using small claims court by yourself or hiring a lawyer. You might not have ever had to sue someone before, but things happen...

One thing that the video gets wrong, in my opinion, is the idea that you should only sue if you can win. In fact, a lawsuit, if it has any merit at all, is often just a tool to get the other party to settle with you. I once had to sue a man who sold me products for a business I had, and as soon as I filed in small claims court and paid the extra $15 to have the sheriff serve him his papers, he called and agreed to refund my money as he had promised. I may not have won the case (our agreement was verbal), but he didn't want the trouble or the possibility of paying more than he did.

Secrets of Getting Rid of Your Credit Card Debt

You might be aware that you can sometimes negotiate with your credit card companies. But it isn't just the interest rate that can be adjusted, or a late payment penalty that can waived. You can sometimes have the balance itself negotiated down. In the video here Kenny Golde explains how he negotiated with seven credit card companies to get his credit card debt down from $212,000 to $30,000. He also explains how he happened to have that much debt to begin with--it's a good example of how unexpected things can happen and leave you with no alternatives but bankruptcy or negotiation.

You might have noticed that credit card companies do not want to negotiate if you are current on your account. You may have to stop paying for a while. Yes, this will wreck your credit score for years. But then, if you had $212,000 in debt and were unable to pay, your credit score is probably no longer salvageable in any case.

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